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Women Targeted by Crime Project

Dyfed-Powys Police and Crime Commissioner Christopher Salmon, Gwalia's Lyndsay Bone and Ceri Page, Ella Rabaiotti of the Wales Community Rehabilitation Company and Sgt Darren Moore, of Dyfed-Powys Police.

Scheme aims to help first-time offenders

A new initiative has been launched to reduce offending and re-offending by women in Dyfed-Powys.

Low-risk offenders and those thought likely to offend will be guided through the Women's Pathfinder Diversion Scheme. 

It aims to prevent crime and help women fix their lives. Most will have complex needs, possibly being victims themselves. 

The support will help them address underlying issues, avoid trouble and help build relationships.

Dyfed-Powys elected Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) Christopher Salmon said: "I want to give women every chance of staying away from crime.
"Pathfinder will give them the help they need and will, as a result, make our communities safer."

Mr Salmon and Wales' other three PCCs secured Home Office funding of around £235,000 to run a Pathfinder pilot in each force area.

The first Dyfed-Powys pilot will operate in Pembrokeshire where around 850 women are arrested each year; more than 50 of them will be suitable for the initiative. 

For duration of the pilot, all women arrested and taken to Haverfordwest Police Station will be considered for the scheme.

Pathfinder workers - from housing, care and support organisation Grwp Gwalia - will work with the police to agree appropriate interventions or services. This may be housing support, debt advice, access to mental health services, domestic abuse support, substance misuse help or another service. 

Women's Pathfinder is an Integrated Offender Management (IOM) Cymru partnership scheme led by the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) in Wales and the four police forces in Wales.

The Pembrokeshire pilot was officially launched (note: on March 1) when criminal justice partners and associates met at the Pembrokeshire Agricultural Society, Haverfordwest.

Dyfed-Powys Police Sgt Darren Moore, said: "Pathfinder is about intervening at the earliest opportunity to provide support and prevent escalation of offending behaviour.

"It also ensures that those already in the criminal justice system have the support they need to move away from trouble and play a positive role in their families and neighbourhoods."

Andrew Vye, Director of Housing and Support for Gwalia, said: "Pathfinder helps ensure that support agencies which work alongside the criminal justice system work in unison.

"When those at risk of re-offending receive the support they need from the correct agencies at the correct time, they are more likely to break the cycle. 
"Earlier multi-agency intervention helps us achieve positive outcomes for local victims, families and the wider communities."

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